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San Antonio Missions
National Historical Park
San Antonio, Texas


Download a Park Map (PDF) - courtesy of NPS


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A city of more than one million inhabitants, San Antonio is the top tourist destination in Texas. The San Antonio Missions National Historical Park is responsible for a significant amount of interest in the city, providing a glimpse into the past and honoring the rich Spanish influence that has helped shape the city. While Mission San Antonio de Valero, better known as the Alamo, is San Antonio's best recognized mission, the National Historical Park is comprised of four equally significant missions: Mission Concepción, Mission San Jose, Mission San Juan Capistrano, and Mission Espada, all of which are located along the San Antonio River.

With the exception of Mission Espada, the missions are connected by the 7.1 mile Mission Hike and Bike Trail (Mission Road), a paved two-lane road accessible by motor vehicle, foot traffic, and bicycle. A large portion of Mission Road runs parallel to the San Antonio River, affording visitors potential birding opportunities for species such as egrets, great blue herons, and terns. Activities include self-guided tours of the missions, picnicking, bicycling, walking, and nature study.

Mission Highlights

Missions Concepcion, Espada and San Juan Capistrano were established in 1731; mission San Jose was established in 1720.

  • Mission Concepcion includes the oldest unrestored stone church in the United States and its acoustics are said to be superb.
  • Mission Espada features a functional 1740's irrigation system complete with aqueduct; the aqueduct is a National Historic Landmark.
  • Mission San Jose is both a State and National Historic Site that has been fully restored.
  • Mission San Juan Capistrano has also been restored. Active parishes are located at all four of the historic missions.

For additional information, an online historical tour of the San Antonio Missions is available via the National Park Service's Knowledge Trail.



Shannon's Notebook

Spanish Mission, San Jose
Mission San Jose
Copyright © Justin W. Moore
See more photos at OutdoorPhoto.com
Visitation to the missions is fairly constant throughout the year, although summer temperatures and humidity in San Antonio can prove physically taxing. Summertime visitors are encouraged to plan visits early in the morning, dress appropriately, and drink plenty of water. For a leisurely walk along the banks of the old San Antonio River, visit Mission San Juan Capistrano's 1/3 mile paved San Juan Woodlands Trail, located directly behind the mission. The area is densely forested with boardwalks and benches located along the route. Several large stands of native bamboo flourish along the trail and bird life is abundant.

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Location

To reach Mission Concepcion, take the Probandt exit from I-10 and follow the National Park signs; the mission is located at 807 Mission Road. Park Service staff at Mission Concepcion can assist you in reaching the other missions.
Map of Mission Concepcion's Location

For GPS Users: N 29° 23.283'   W 098° 29.80' (WGS84/NAD83)
Convert to another coordinate sytem or map datum (Courtesy of Jeeep.com)

Hours

Open 7 days a week year-round (except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day) from 9 AM to 5 PM.

Fees

There is no entrance fee for the park.

Events

N/A

Weather

Click for San Antonio, Texas Forecast

Volunteer Opportunities

Check the park's volunteer positions listing for detailed information.

Contact Information

The park is managed by the U.S. National Park Service (NPS).

U.S. National Park Service San Antonio Missions National Historical Park
2202 Roosevelt Avenue
San Antonio, Texas 78210-4919

Park Office: (210)932-1001
Email: SAAN_Superintendent@nps.gov

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